Tag Archive for: love

i don’t love that he gets in me

11 Out
11.10.2018

I don’t love that he gets in me;
I don’t love that he strolls in me;
I don’t love that he has fun in me;
Him? He loves to get in and out of me:
without remorse, without morality.
But today I decided to take back the possession of the key for me:
I killed him.
And, now, I love to be eating him piece by piece into me.

09 Abr
09.04.2018 He woke up next to her, and still experienced that visceral thrill of being not just accepted and wanted, but loved.
Theories of Flight de Simon Morden (página 110)

honey bee

18 Nov
18.11.2017

‘Honey bee do you want make love?’
‘Hell NO! I don’t want to spend more time around the stove.’
‘Ah! What! So…’
‘I want sex, wild sex…’

blue sparkles de sissy pantelis e vurore

16 Jan
16.01.2017
blue sparkles

here I am

I usually read accompanied by the sound of good music. I almost always choose between a touch of jazz by the master Chet Baker or I lazily listen to the Stabat Mater of Dvořák. After all they are the CDs that are almost stapled to my old CD player. These musical choices did not work with Blue Sparkles by Sissy Pantelis. So, I read the book without sound and then in the second passage through the final lap – kaaapooooom, I chose Wrath of the Lich King (OST) for a new reading – magic!

… odd thoughts …

  • In the two spreads in which the prince ventures with his mother the rags of the fog create an atmosphere of perfect melancholy – secrecy.
  • The prince’s mount, “a bird” has brought memories of World of Warcraft. How can I ever forget the gryphons of the Alliance!
  • After the talk with Feather-Horn we have three spreads with so many, but so many details – delicious – that they alone raise the bar of what can be expected. Is the step bigger than the leg? No, it was not.
  • Throughout the book one can discover immense references to works of fantasy, just throw the cards and be very careful with the queen of hearts.
  • We have Firework Dancers, Pixies and even an owl piper. Ah! And Swan Knights… So much visual detail that each spread should be read-seen-seen-read repeatedly (loop-on mode) so that nothing gets lost – okay?
  • I do not know how the collaboration between the artist and the writer was; maybe healthily sick? Watch the first panel of the story; in the anguish of the mushrooms; how much they suffer from the fiddly music of the frogs – brilliant!
  • Individualized balloons that make the characters’ voices different.
  • The moon red spread is abysmal.

Blue Sparkles is a musical book. Mysterious. A kaleidoscope of text, image and sound. Venetian masks, apple, shoe, Hansel, snow, red hood, crows – explosion. TAM. TAM. TAM.

If I already loved Sissy, the inclusion of crows was a tasty “Nevermooorrre” that made me smile with my mouth open. Dear Poe.

TAM. TAM. TAM. And the drums come to life and set the pace. TAM. TAM. TAM, in the background. Here I go to the end of a love story … Will a good story have an unfortunate end? End. Beginning. Perfidia. Mistake. Con. End of the nightmare, perhaps? Intermezzo and opening of a new chapter with a rainbow that reminds me of the Bifrost bridge, but without the presence of the mighty Heimdall.

TAM. TAM. TAM. Books inside a book and we have a wonderful library, naturally full with books, but equally filled with the tree of knowledge and a cat and a rabbit, too – Alice where are you?

A book that I read quickly, but that should be slowly tasted as a dream of a summer night, right brother Oberon?

Here are my loose and incoherent thoughts. I can do much more with a story full of changes, turns, with the introduction of details and more details and more characters around the corner.

Blue Sparkles with texts by Sissy Pantelis and drawings by Vurore is a mesmerizing book. As hypnotizing as that brown butterfly that flies through the book spying the unfolding of the story

Are beauty and love not the most powerful magic?” – yes and also good books.

love me

26 Out
26.10.2016

‘Love me.’
‘Sorry, I don’t want to miss the train.’


Esta história de 10 palavras foi submetida e aceite para publicação.

melodious interview to teri lee kline

08 Fev
08.02.2015

info

Just knowing Teri Lee Kline by what she writes is easy to see that she’s full of vitality, humanity and with a heart of an intoxicating sweetness. She is also a writer that can, easily, dazzled me. See, for instance, the work “Snakes At His Feet”.

A while ago I did a little acrostic with the word Teri, and here it is:
Today we
embrace with
rejoicing the
illuminated presence of Teri Lee Kline.

1. Do you have a specific writing style?

My writing is intensely personal. I try to go directly to the heart of the matter. This is especially important, for obvious reasons, in very short fiction. This does hold true for me, however, regardless of the form I am utilizing. My longer fiction, creative non-fiction, journalistic pieces and even the interviews I conduct have this as the hallmark, as well. My heart is forever on my sleeve for all to see.

2. What books have most influenced your life?

When, in my youth, I read To Kill a Mockingbird and The Grapes of Wrath I was unalterably set on a course to view the world in a certain way. They were monumental books for my education and evolving character. Then, as a teenager, reading To The Lighthouse, Mrs. Dalloway, The Waves, A Room of One’s Own, I was blown away with the possibilities in language, words, and literature. It was after reading these Virginia Woolf classics that I began my lifelong love affair with reading and writing. Lastly, James Agee’s A Death in the Family, my favorite novel, taught me about writing from the truest depth of my heart, how to evoke mood, and power. Phenomenal book.

3. If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

I consider teachers, more than other writers, my mentors. I had a teacher in my youth, Mrs. Delphine Johnson, who recognized in me an innate talent for expressing myself through the written word. She was the first to identify this and encouraged me throughout my school years. My English professor at the University of Minnesota worked endlessly with me and was at my side when I won the Best Freshman Writer scholarship that year. I will never forget these teachers. Of late, a dear friend, Jason Rolfe, encouraged me to submit my work for publication. He is a wonderful writer, mentor and mensch! I am forever indebted to him.

4. What are your current projects?

I always have several projects brewing at any given moment. Presently, I am collecting my very short fiction pieces and will begin the process of looking for a publisher. I am also at work on a book length project about very small towns of the world. I also love conducting interviews and doing profiles of writers and artists. I usually have one of those in the works. I would love to start my own journal of food related fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and photography. I’m working towards that goal, as well.

5. How much research do you do?

It depends on the project, but I normally choose projects that do not require much research.

6. Do you write full-time or part-time?

I write as often as I can. My notebook is ever ready.

7. Where do your ideas come from?

My ideas come from many places: my observations of people, from observing nature, from my dreams, from stories in the news. Most often my best ideas come to me when I am in that blessed and magical state between wakefulness and sleep. It is usually in moments of silence that my muse speaks.

8. How can readers discover more about you and you work?

I have found Facebook and Twitter to be useful tools for connecting with readers and especially with other writers and artists. My posts are generally very personal in nature. People respond well to this and for this I am pleased and grateful. I am quite new to the world of publishing so therefore do not have a long list of credits. I was very happy to be featured on the pages of Literary Orphans multiple times, Sein und Werden and also, the Utter Nonsense issue of the international journal of experimental and absurdist literature and art, The Black Scat Review.

what the giants were saying by david rix

03 Jan
03.01.2015

What the Giants Were Saying is accompanied here by the shorter work that inspired it, Red Fire, a piece that pushes the boundaries of extreme horror into a visionary and surreal world of love and pain, great white moths and tattooed skin, and above all, into the world of story itself.

Eibonvale Press

What the Giants Were Saying, with a perfect set up and with a great structure, is a strange story about domination and guilty, about dreams and fear, about pain, about hell and anguish, about refuge: no salvation, no cure. What the Giants Were Saying is a trip in your mind. Is deep, complex and multi-layered. Lots to take in, lots to read again and enjoy.

David Rix takes things to the extreme. It’s delightful how the story constantly establishes new points without ever getting monotonous. It gets hard to believe that the ending will be able to explain everything and I start speculate about that there can only be one possible conclusion for all the events – no conclusion at all.

To me the biggest achievement of the book is, that it’s never creepy just for the sake of freaking the reader out; every line has its purpose. Nonetheless, it is a very disturbing, but also compelling and mesmerized, book.

facts about me

26 Ago
26.08.2014

Facts about me:

paulo, cabeça

o que vai dentro da minha cabeça (versão 1.0)

  1. I’m very calm, except when I get mad.
  2. Yes, I earn my living making fun of nuns and I have already bought a cottage in Sawsea – praise the LORD.
  3. I do not personally know Rhys Hughes and I’m frightened to meet him in person; I’m sure he’s going to give me the tango. And I think I haven’t enough space at home to keep the tango alive.
  4. I love the PETA moto (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) and the PETA moto (People Eating Tasty Animals) – yes, I feed myself of sophists dialectic.
  5. I don’t like football, but if some salad have balls of cheddar cheese I will lick the balls.

for 5 days 3 positive things of my life

25 Ago
25.08.2014

I’ve been nominated by Rhys Hughes to post for 5 days 3 positive things of my life

My 3 positives for day 1 are:
  1. I’m a human fan, not a electric one, of Rhys Hughes: the one writer who truly made a difference in my life.
  2. I finished reading a new story: “Trolls de Troy -18- Pröfy Blues”
  3. The barber shave me. I did not recognize myself in the mirror. I shouted. He yelled. The cat ran away. No mirror broke.
My 3 positives for day 2 are:
  1. I hired a goblin to clean my glasses. I now see a more colorful world. I go, however, constantly against the poles – a painful side effect.
  2. When I was 15 years I went for the last time to a witch she told me and to my mother that I had an open body. However I don’t find nothing abnormal with my body, except a huge appetite for knowledge.
  3. I had a vasectomy in 2010. The good thing about this is that I can sin without fertilize. The negative: have been surrounded by so many nurses I could not have since that date more sexual fetishes with nurses.
My 3 positives for day 3 are:

eu a true nerd

a true nerd!

  1. I had an enormous lucky to have outstanding grandmothers and grandfathers. My grandmother, by my father side, was a devout Christian. Every holy Sunday I went with her to the church, but I disliked going to the church and I pass the time counting how many bald heads where in the church. Now I have also a bald head but I am not part of any statistics.
  2. One day I told to my daughter that I don’t have a zero in the head but a airfield. She, then, glued on my head a plane toy. I was the proud owner of a portable airfield.
  3. Today I lost weight. I’m so happy. Now I can tell that I walk and not roll. Wait, what I see so far away but getting closer? Oh! Is my weight, I didn’t know that my weigh was equipped with GPS.
My 3 positives for day 4 are:
  1. I love beer. So I drink beer, like right now
  2. My son is at home. We are now all together, the four. A gestalt family.
  3. Tomorrow is the day before holidays!
My 3 positives for day 5 are:
  1. I love my wife Carla Carvalho Faria and my daughter and my son, and my mother and my father and all you that know that I love you.
  2. Like Jason E. Rolfe I have a sister. Is only one but she is equal to seven sisters. Thanks Glória Brito. Without you I am not me.
  3. I’m so luck to have virtual meet so amazing people like Rhys Hughes, Jason E. Rolfe, David Rix, Fiona Duffin, Adele Whittle, Ricardo Acevedo Esplugas, Ian Towey, Mercie Pedro E Silva, Sissy Pantelis, Carlos Rocha, Garrett Cook, Brendan Connell, Gisela Monteiro and many others (I only use the left side). I’ve meet equal nice and good people like César Figueiredo, Diogo Carvalho, Hugo Teixeira, Susana Leite and many, many others – all of you can turn my gloomy days into sunny days. Because all of you are so fascinating and true people.
    1. A special thanks to my dear friend Hugo Cardoso
    2. A special hug to my like sons Jorge Dias and Patrícia Marques and a big kiss to the mother of this two Lurdes Marques. And I miss you so much my forever friend Jorge Dias, the father.
    3. I know I miss someone but you know I love you, and you and you…

bottled love story by rhys hughes

04 Jul
04.07.2014

It’s easier to close a drawer with a key and then put the key inside the drawer, is easier to discover the speed of darkness, than be able to make a review of a book written by Rhys Hughes. I will, however, undertake this task, but only because I live in Meridian 0°.

A way of increasing with success the number of words to a review is to add things that at first glance have nothing to do with the book but with the author. For example: who knew that Rhys Hughes in 2007 has used a bottle to send in Toledo a message to Safaa via the Tagus River? The fact that he now puts the love in a bottle means that he has a loving fixation for bottles?

1398585

bottled love story

Now seriously.

chapter: The Story Begins with the Wave

In the first 16 pages of the book was difficult for me to find that I was reading a story of Rhys Hughes; but quickly I find the words of the villainous Rhys Hughes that even dares to enter as only he knows in the story, because? and I am forced to remind his own words:

As far as I am concerned there can only ever be two characters in a work of fiction — the author and the reader. The other “characters” are just words on a page and simply don’t exist.

Rhys Hughes

The chapter “The Story Begins with the Wave” is writing in the cinematographic style. We have the narration of Amira’s [1] wanderings interspersed with the adventures of Rufus Anton [2]; at the end of the story the two characters find themselves together in a unconventional and nothing loving way – I should add.

In this chapter we have an Rhys Hughes equal to himself, irreverent, tortuous, with ideas and a structure narrative that reminds us of the inventive skills of Dr. Karl Mondaugen. We have a bottle, a chess problem (the first time I read a book with a chess problem was the “Flanders Panel” by Arturo Pérez-Reverte) and the possible existence of the sea monster Xaratan.

The story begins with the wave because

AMIRA wrote her name on the sand of the beach in big capitals and when the tide came in it washed away the last two letters first, so she was left with a question that just needed the addition of a question mark.
Am I?” she wondered.
She knew she must find an answer (…)

page 7


The first answer

bottled love story

“Perhaps I am, perhaps not” (…)

page 8

 

A few lines later the author reveals an important characteristic of Amira for the unfolding of the story

Amira was curious about everything and this curiosity extended even to curiosity itself. What was curiosity? Why did it exist?

page 9


The second answer
after reading the message discovery inside the green bottle send by Rufus Anton.

bottled love story

Not yet, not yet.

page 13

 

And so Amira turned and walked back the way she had come and to her great astonishment she found that the last two letters of her name written on the sand weren’t obliterated by the tide at all but had merely been detached from the others and had floated intact first out to sea and then back again.

Who’s Rufus, by the way? The author explains

(..) Rufus was one of those people who forget to worry about anything and he seemed to have an instinct that meant he always ended up where he ought to be, even if he didn’t recognise that final place for what it was when he got there.

page 16

 

And are the questions

“What is curiosity? Why does it exist?”

page 17

 

said by Dr Karl Mondaugen, “a mad scientist“, that continues to be what moves the story. It is, therefore, the curiosity that leads Amira to “the oldest part of the university” where “was a library full of strange books, one of which was a bestiary of imaginary animals that included an entry on the xaratan [3]. But the xaratan, of course, isn’t imaginary.

At this time we are introduced to another animal that’s a real myth the Hound-Do-You-Do; see a photo of the animal with Ryhs Hughes.

hound-do-you-do and rhys hughes

hound-do-you-do and rhys hughes

Rhys Hughes does not miss the opportunity to introduce himself in the story as only he knows

Although I am only the author of this story and not one of the characters in it, and thus must always stand outside rather than within whatever happens now or next, I am happy to state that I once met the Hound-Do-You Do on one of the rare occasions when I was drunk.

pages 19/20

 

Amira reveals in the following words to be a woman with a strong character and that isn’t up to handle random daydreams – lucky us the readers. I started to like her even more.

Amira said, “This story belongs to the characters and you, the author, should really stay out of it.”

page 20

 

Throughout this chapter we have several verbal pearls; and this is why I love some much reading Rhys Hughes

(…) For example, when the concept of ‘repetition’ was invented it was hardly of any distinction until it was invented yet again, and it fulfils its function more wonderfully each time it is newly invented.”

page 22

 

“He was the Half Mate on the clipper ship Toe Scissors which sailed out of Nailcutta.”
“You mean Calcutta,” corrected Karl.
“Yes, I do, but that pun doesn’t work as well. (…)

page 23

 

They keep appearing many surprises but it’s on page 29 which is shown the greatest surprise: a “abandoned sea” chess game where

The cannonballs were pawns, the pistols were rooks, the suits of armour were knights, the tall hats were bishops, the sea-chests were kings and the cannon were queens and some pieces had been stained black and others white.

page 29

 

The chess problem that Amira will solve was created by Leonid Yarosh and it was “first published in March 1983 in the famous Russian chess magazine Shakhmaty v SSSR” [4] and “it is generally considered one of the greatest chess problems ever composed.” [4]

The words in this chapter continues to flow like the ocean waves. We have the ever present of the talented and magic Rhys Hughes. And he knows how to hold the reader to a story without using glue – fantastic! And when we notice we are looking at the last lines of the chapter.

He (Rufus Anton) was only dimly aware of a woman’s voice telling him that he had spoiled the game as she was about the make the move that would result in checkmate.

page 35


chapter: The Solution to the Problem

About this chapter I do not have much to say, not because I don’t want to, but simply because I can’t. I must blame the author for the way he wrote the chapter.

On the first pages Amira and Rufus begin to interact in a harmless way, but at the end of the story about the Xaratan the love begins to reveal itself. It is difficult for me to write about the chapter because from page 39 we have two stories simultaneously narrated: one “the main” story, other “the Xaratan” story.

chateau cheval sombre de la mer

new wine brand

When reached this part of the book is indifferent summarize what’s going on and is preferable to write how Rhys Hughes found graphically, so to speak, a way to tell the two stories at the same time. He ingeniously split up the pages into two columns.
In a column there is the story, that I call “the main” in which the font used is bigger; in another column we have the “xaratanic” story in which he used a smaller font. This artifice goes over 10 pages and it works very well.
I advise you to first read the story about the xaratan, keeping it in memory, step back 10 pages and read “the main” story. I laughed at the end exactly as Amira laughed.

The two stories “mate” perfectly – Rhys Hughes did a wonderful job. You need to read it.

From this union of words and after Rufus having closed the book and for

(…) the first time he looked at Amira properly, directly in the eyes, and instantly he lost all his old anxieties and acquired a set of new ones. His mouth opened and he said:
“You are as beautiful as a goddess.”

page 47

 

As they say that God writes in mysterious ways, also Rhys can write about love in a different way, but consistent with his verbal traps, puns; only he can mesmerize the reader with these words:

“Then take my hand and stop me from drowning in your lovely eyes.”

page 48

 

“Lake of my eye? That’s singular. Don’t you mean lakes in the plural?”
“This is just one of the lakes,” said Rufus, as his shoes squelched. “No man can look into both of a woman’s eyes at the same time. His gaze will switch from one to the other.”

page 48

 

this is Rhys at full steam. An he even have the chance to create a new wine brand: Chateau Cheval Sombre de la Mer.

The next chapter will be equally surprising and why? Because I read

This method of telling stories without using words is an invention of Italo Calvino and to him I now pay modest homage.

page 53


chapter: The Chamber of Crossed Destinies

This chapter is the easiest to comment. Where to start?
It’s full of pictures and are the images (tarot cards) that tell the story. And of course I will not recount the plot the cards are telling. I, only, can add that just reading this chapter you can realize not only the beauty of the chapter, but also the genius of Rhys Hughes.

And that single empty space was communal to both of them, so a collision of Fates was unavoidable.

page 60


chapter: The Thousand and One Kisses

And here’s the last chapter in which much is revealed.
The author is warned, again, to stay out of the story when he’s discovered disguised into a painter by our characters?

“I thought I asked you to stay out of this text and not bother your characters,” Amira said to me in a tone of weary disapproval.

page 64

The author attempts to justify is presence with brilliant puns, but

“You and your wordplay!” sighed Amira.

page 65

Once again the brilliance of Rhys Hughes is present in every line. He does not simply tell a story; he provides the reader with visual and language jokes – we just need to pay attention to the page 70 where we are faced with the transformation of the initial game of chess on a game of seduction.

I don’t dare to recount the details of this chapter. I only add that Rhys Hughes has created an ingenious story of love and – checkmate!

The book has another unusual features not seen in other books by Rhys Hughes, started:

  • by the layout of title
bottled love story - tittle

bottled love story – tittle

  • by the existence of lots of pictures
  • for typographic diversity like this one

bottled love story

  • or this one – the book has this precious image at the beginning of some paragraphs.

bottled love story

 

infos

[1] arabic name
[2] which meant “red-haired” in latin
[3] the sea monster Xaratan was first mentioned in a conversation between Dr Karl Mondaugen and Rufus. (page 18)
[4] from Wikipedia

leonid yarosh
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