Tag Archive for: nightmare

blue sparkles de sissy pantelis e vurore

16 Jan
16.01.2017
blue sparkles

here I am

I usually read accompanied by the sound of good music. I almost always choose between a touch of jazz by the master Chet Baker or I lazily listen to the Stabat Mater of Dvořák. After all they are the CDs that are almost stapled to my old CD player. These musical choices did not work with Blue Sparkles by Sissy Pantelis. So, I read the book without sound and then in the second passage through the final lap – kaaapooooom, I chose Wrath of the Lich King (OST) for a new reading – magic!

… odd thoughts …

  • In the two spreads in which the prince ventures with his mother the rags of the fog create an atmosphere of perfect melancholy – secrecy.
  • The prince’s mount, “a bird” has brought memories of World of Warcraft. How can I ever forget the gryphons of the Alliance!
  • After the talk with Feather-Horn we have three spreads with so many, but so many details – delicious – that they alone raise the bar of what can be expected. Is the step bigger than the leg? No, it was not.
  • Throughout the book one can discover immense references to works of fantasy, just throw the cards and be very careful with the queen of hearts.
  • We have Firework Dancers, Pixies and even an owl piper. Ah! And Swan Knights… So much visual detail that each spread should be read-seen-seen-read repeatedly (loop-on mode) so that nothing gets lost – okay?
  • I do not know how the collaboration between the artist and the writer was; maybe healthily sick? Watch the first panel of the story; in the anguish of the mushrooms; how much they suffer from the fiddly music of the frogs – brilliant!
  • Individualized balloons that make the characters’ voices different.
  • The moon red spread is abysmal.

Blue Sparkles is a musical book. Mysterious. A kaleidoscope of text, image and sound. Venetian masks, apple, shoe, Hansel, snow, red hood, crows – explosion. TAM. TAM. TAM.

If I already loved Sissy, the inclusion of crows was a tasty “Nevermooorrre” that made me smile with my mouth open. Dear Poe.

TAM. TAM. TAM. And the drums come to life and set the pace. TAM. TAM. TAM, in the background. Here I go to the end of a love story … Will a good story have an unfortunate end? End. Beginning. Perfidia. Mistake. Con. End of the nightmare, perhaps? Intermezzo and opening of a new chapter with a rainbow that reminds me of the Bifrost bridge, but without the presence of the mighty Heimdall.

TAM. TAM. TAM. Books inside a book and we have a wonderful library, naturally full with books, but equally filled with the tree of knowledge and a cat and a rabbit, too – Alice where are you?

A book that I read quickly, but that should be slowly tasted as a dream of a summer night, right brother Oberon?

Here are my loose and incoherent thoughts. I can do much more with a story full of changes, turns, with the introduction of details and more details and more characters around the corner.

Blue Sparkles with texts by Sissy Pantelis and drawings by Vurore is a mesmerizing book. As hypnotizing as that brown butterfly that flies through the book spying the unfolding of the story

Are beauty and love not the most powerful magic?” – yes and also good books.

red nightmare by sissy pantelis and danilo antoniucci

17 Nov
17.11.2016

This opinion will not have an order, rather an orderly disorder.

Let’s see …

It’s not easy to make an acceptable “society” using animals that behave like humans. But the society of anthropomorphized animals created in Red Nightmare, by the perfect choice of species is an excellent “mirror” society. I can identify, in the facial expressions of animals/characters, the savagery, love, hatred, fatigue, perfidy, wisdom, fear, courage, revolt… The detail of the hyenas, the rabbit ghetto – perfect.

Danilo Antoniucci with a sturdy and musical trace created credible characters who transpired the good and the bad of humanity. If I have to choose a favorite character I point the finger at Night Wanderer: it’s the touch of humor in the story, the element that breaks the tension; the character that we envy for the freedom with which he flies for adventure.

Visually, Red Nightmare is a crazy, fun, colorful – wonderful trip.

The pages where the transition from the real world(?) to the dream world(?) occurs, are very well achieved – excellent color work.

The initial page is delicious: a towering castle, guards with an evil grin, a mother that wards off a child and the soliloquy of an anonymous actor deepens the text of the caption and so… the magic begins.

First, flip through the pages and see the images …
Second, read the text and see the images …
Third, read the pictures and see the text …
Reverse this order and mix everything up …

The text begins, from the very start, by embracing the images and soon on the fifth page we have the words ‘I can only help you see the future through me’ which will make the story take a magical leap into another more magical world – magic within magic, story within story; rabbit inside the magician’s hat. Text, image, special effects – kaboom!

Another kaboom and pause. Shock, surprise. Wow, what now?

And the words of Sissy Pantelis go along with the images and the images go along with the words without competition, in union. And the two elements well combined, oiled, offer the reader astonishment, pain, suspense, confusion …

‘CRI CRI CRI’ is fear to one and a surprise to the reader. ‘That’s … not good!’ is said – but it’s good, it’s, very good.

We have pages without text in which Sissy Pantelis boldly lets Danilo Antoniucci write with images; a wonderful writer who writes words in the silence of expressions, in the silence of moments. The reader is invited to think for himself, is gently pushed there, there, beyond.

And the story hurries, runs very fast and even flies (new inclusion of a story in the story – a bit of homage to another story, perhaps Peter, maybe Pan – I do not know!)

And when the artist and the writer finish without the consent of the reader, but with meaning, the story, I say:

You have got to be joking – it’s over?! How? And I begin to leaf through the book until, without any other solution, I place it there beside me on the shelf.

magical interview to sissy pantelis

08 Jan
08.01.2015

info

I first met Sissy Pantelis in The Ironic Fantastic # 1, the story “Hunted”; it was love at first letter – two “first” can be a redundancy, but it was what I could write.
She creates the most charming stories that I’ve read with words that are endearing and amusing. I can feel, always, alive the sense of wonder and imagination that inhabited Sissy’s heart and mind; completely drawn into her worlds don’t knowing if I am going to cry, laugh… hypnotic and touching words she have.
“How fine is the line between fantasy and reality? And if we unleash our imaginations, just how far will they take us?” – answers that can be found at Sissy’s stories.Shame on me for not knowing her soon – but the fault is all mine.
1. Do you have a specific writing style?

I always try to write clearly for the readers. My priority is to be understood – not to make beautiful, long sentences. I don’t think that my style is literary and complicated. I prefer short, clear sentences that people can understand and I try to keep writing in this style. I am also very attentive to rhythm issues – but this is something intuitive, I cannot explain it rationally. I am not good at long narratives and long and complicated descriptions, so I try to avoid them.

2. What books have most influenced your life?

Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream. All fairy tales and mythology- maybe Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tales more than the rest. Greek mythology and Aesope’s myths. And the Brothers Karamazov by Dostoievsky – Crime and Punishment too. When I read Dostoievsky, I felt something difficult to put in words- like an earthquake in my head. I have always loved everything by Oscar Wilde and my philosophy is very much influenced by the Tao Te Ching and the Taoist Philosophers (NOT the religion – the philosophy).

3. If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Oscar Wilde. Also Hans Christian Andersen (he also was a major influence for Oscar Wilde) and Shakespeare with Midsummer Night’s Dream. I have found out that many of my stories were influenced or inspired (even at a sub conscious level) by Midsummer Night’s Dream).

4. What are your current projects?

My comics. If you want to know more about them, please read my interview here:
http://forums.jazmaonline.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=7235

blue sparkles

blue sparkles

Her current comics projects are, and quoting:

Blue Sparkles is a story of a cursed love. The two young lovers escape to Dreamland to be together, but even there, it seems that the curse follows them. The story is inspired by Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream, one of the major influences on my imagination. Art in Blue Sparkles is by wonderful French artist Aurore Barois (aka VURORE).

Sissy Pantelis

Red Nightmare is a story about change and its consequences. It is a story of a cruel king, who decides to change after a hallucination he has while he visits a witch (whom he tortures at first). It is also about being at peace with your own self, about inner harmony. I found out that it was a very important thing and maybe one of the most difficult tasks one can attempt in his lifetime. Now, Red Nightmare is NOT a philosophy book; it is a fairy tale featuring anthropomorphic animals. As all my stories, it is first aimed to entertain and make readers dream. But change has always been an important factor in my life and the main theme of this story is change. The artist working on this story is Italian artist Danilo Antoniucci. I am extremely happy and honored that Danilo accepted this collaboration. I love his art, but I am not the only one to admire Danilo’s talent, so he has a lot of work with his own comics and I can only be grateful that he also works with me.

Sissy Pantelis

Dark Siren is the story of a young girl that discovers that she has a wonderful gift, but her gift can harm other people – especially those who offend her. The young girl is scared, so she leaves her home fearing she may inadvertently harm her family. Then she finds out that she is not alone to possess that kind of poisonous gift. Dark Siren is a special story to me. First, there is something of me in the main character of the story. For a long while, I thought that dreaming and writing was a sort of curse cast on me… To come back to Dark Siren, my young niece helped me a lot in making the story and gave me many ideas for the plot; that was a wonderful experience. And last (but not least), the artist working on this story is José Leonardo aka The Chulo. José is from Colombia and his style is very special. I believe that José has really given this story another dimension. He is extremely gifted and he is now also working on the characters of a movie (by the people who did How to Train Your Dragon).

Sissy Pantelis

I have other projects- among other things, I have one or two novels in mind, but that will be for much later so we would rather speak about them in the future than now.

5. How much research do you do?

Quite a lot actually. Most of my stories are pure fantasy and the true things in them are very few, but I need to do a lot of research to get inspiration.

6. Do you write full-time or part-time?

I write full time and I don’t wish to change this – writing is a passion and doing something else at the same time is a big mistake, I found out at a great cost a few years back.

7. Where do your ideas come from?

I am not sure. Sometimes from fairy tales; but I also get a lot of ideas by listening to music or through my dreams!!! 🙂

8. How can readers discover more about you and you work?

I am on Deviant Art: http://gliovampire.deviantart.com – I try to keep the journal updated when anything new comes out.
I am also on FB: https://www.facebook.com/sissy.pantelis and this is my author page:
hhttps://www.facebook.com/pages/Sissy-Pantelis/232168253548554
I have also created a page for Blue Sparkles:
https://www.facebook.com/PuckBlueSparkles
and José and I created a page for Dark Siren:
https://www.facebook.com/darksirengn

If you want to follow my work, you are welcome to follow any of those pages and I am always happy to see comments and answer any questions of the readers.

fantastic interview to lou antonelli

05 Jan
05.01.2015

info

Lou Antonelli started writing fiction in middle age; his first story was published in 2003 when he was 46. He’s had 89 short stories published in the U.S., U.K., Canada and Australia, in venues such as Asimov’s Science Fiction, Jim Baen’s Universe, Dark Recesses, Andromeda Spaceways In-Flight Magazine, Greatest Uncommon Denominator (GUD), Daily Science Fiction, and Omni Reboot, among others.
His collections include “Fantastic Texas” published in 2009; “Texas & Other Planets” published in 2010; and “The Clock Struck None” and “Letters from Gardner”, both published in 2014.
He was a finalist in 2013 for the Sidewise Award in Alternate History.
His story “Great White Ship”, originally published in Daily Science Fiction, was a 2013 finalist for the Sidewise Award for alternate history.
A Massachusetts native, he moved to Texas in 1985 and is married to Dallas native Patricia (Randolph) Antonelli. They have three adopted furbaby children, Millie, Sugar and Peltro Antonelli.
lou antonelli

lou antonelli

Since I read his story published on The Ironic Fantastic # 3, I bought shortly after “The Clock Struck None” that I hope to read as soon as I clean the current stack of books. I’ve read other stories and from what I read is an author that I recommend with my eyes closed.
1. Do you have a specific writing style?

The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction says “In a spare, swift, convincing narrative style, conveying in a deadpan voice a wide array of sometimes paranoid suppositions about the world, Antonelli juxtaposes realities with very considerable skill…” That’s a very good analysis. My style is very matter-of-fact because it is a natural outgrowth of my career as a journalist.

2. What books have most influenced your life?

Strangely enough, none of them fiction. I didn’t start writing fiction until I was 42, so the formative books I read when I was young were non-fiction. “Lovely is the Lee” by Robert Gibbons was one, “Asking for Trouble” by South African journalist Donald Woods is another. All the s-f I read when I was young were in magazines. I’ve always liked short stories, and not just in s-f; I’ve always been a great admirer of O. Henry.

3. If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

Howard Waldrop. I loved his work when I was just a reader, and when I started writing and sought him out, I found him friendly and very accessible.

4. What are your current projects?

After having 90 short stories published in eleven years, and four collections, I’ve been told by multiple people I need to write a novel. I think that makes a lot of sense, there are people out there who are curious as to what I could produce at book-length.

5. How much research do you do?

Less than you would imagine. I don’t write hard s-f, I don’t have the mind for hard science. Most of my research consists of checking to see whether I remember correctly something I already knew.

6. Do you write full-time or part-time?

Part-time.

7. Where do your ideas come from?

Phrases or images that come out of my mind and persist. Stephen King said he doesn’t need to make up plots for horror stories, he just remembers his nightmares. I do the same, but with my daydreams. The time I saw a cloud that reminded me of a dirigible stuck in my brain and after a number of years germinated as my Sidewise Award nominated story “Great White Ship”.

8. How can readers discover more about you and you work?

My blog is www.louantonelli.blogspot.com

I have a reprint blog at http://www.otherwisealternatehistory.blogspot.com

My collections are available at
http://www.merryblacksmith.com
http://www.fantasticbooks.biz
http://www.yarddogpress.com

Heck, just email me at solacesdaddy@yahoo.com

my muse

09 Nov
09.11.2014

My muse is the hatred, the obsession, the anguish, the death, the night, the nightmares, the dreams, the fear, the joy, the doubt.

10341943

o mar pode inspirar..

My muse is not amusing, but it does its purpose – inspires creation.

wolverine: hauntings

06 Mai
06.05.2011

Esta história, publicada na revista Marvel Comics Presents n.º 99 e 100, com Wolverine, Nightmare, Ghost Rider e Doctor Doom, com desenhos de Jim Valentino é uma história singular, mas que prima pela qualidade das ilustrações.

wolverine, hauntings

“Tormentos”, na tradução, foi lida na revista Wolverine n.º 38 pela Abril Jovem em 1995.

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